Be aware of severe weather and other hazards - A NOAA All Hazards Radio Saves Lives
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Weather Radio Frequencies

"Most" stations broadcast on a special VHF frequency band at 162 MHz, which has seven FM channels specially reserved for weather radio broadcasts and now includes "intermediate" channels of 162.425, 162.450, 162.500, and 162.525 MHz. These channels (often numbered in that order) are receivable on special weather radio receivers, available here at Weather Radio USA and are also found on most modern marine VHF radio transceivers, amateur radio trancievers, and digital communications scanners.

American television stations weather departments market there weather radios as an "essential warning device" on par with a "smoke detector" for home fires. In other words, if you don't have one, you could be risking your life for the matter of a few dollars.

The primary broadcast frequencies for all NOAA weather radio alerting services can be found below with more specific information available on programing for your area available directly from the NOAA NWS website.  NOTE: It may be possible to receive weather broadcasts on more than one of the seven available weather radio channels at a given location. The NWS suggests that users determine which frequency (as opposed to channel) is intended for their specific location so that they are assured of receiving correct information.

 

162.400
MHz
162.425
MHz
162.450
MHz
162.475
MHz
162.500
MHz
162.525
MHz
162.550
MHz

 

County by county coverage, including codes you will need to program your Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) capable NWR receiver can be found here http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/indexnw.htm with marine coverage being found here http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/marine/marsame.htm.

Many television stations which have the capability (both commercial and public) can now also air their local feed of NWR on secondary channels (conditions apply). Some digital subchannels which carry weather information may also have NWR airing in the background, while regular television stations carry the audio during times they are off-the-air and transmitting a test pattern, in lieu of a reference tone.

Most cable systems and some television stations also simulcast a local NOAA Weather Radio station's programming when the Emergency Alert System is activated in the event of a severe weather or civil defense emergency, normally with the issuance of a tornado warning or tornado emergency, especially in tornado-prone areas of the country.